Wills

Why do I need to make a will?

Making a Will is probably the most important document you will ever create.

Because if you die without a valid Will the law will decide who gets what.

If you have no family, all your property and possessions will go to the Crown.

It can take two years to administer an intestacy.

In effect, the Government writes your will for you.

The death of a loved one can cause enough upset in a family, the last thing you want, is for your family to be fighting with each other over the distribution of your Estate, causing more heartbreak, stress and cost.

Why do I need to make a will

Myths

Common Law spouses do not automatically inherit from each other.

Unmarried couples who have not registered a civil partnership inherit nothing whatsoever from each other.

Facts

Your Spouse may not inherit everything if you have children.

Getting Married invalidates your will, unless specifically mentioned.

Getting Divorced treats your ex as having died and may leave you without executors.

Unmarried fathers have no automatic right of guardianship to children.

Appoint Guardians for your children (without a nominated Guardian, you run the risk of your children being taken into the care of the local authorities while the court decides who looks after them).

It may be possible to reduce the amount of inheritance tax payable.

Trusts can be set up for a number of different reasons, including protecting vulnerable beneficiaries.

Keep your will up to date

If your circumstances have changed, it is important that you update your will, for example

Inheriting money – Having Children/Grand Children – Getting Married

Getting Divorced – Death of friends and family – Long term Illness

Buying a property

Christine was friendly and professional, she took time to ensure that she understood our situation and requirements and that we understood the documents prior to signing.

Lisa Huttlestone